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Upcoming Events

30
Apr

Come join us to learn about water conservation techniques, native plants in landscaping and so much more!

30
Apr

Come check out our community gardens at this free family event!

 

06
May

The Endangered Species Faire is a free event for all ages that teaches, entertains and inspires! Come join us! 

13
May

Come out and help us clean up our local Chico creeks! 

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BEC Protects

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The Butte Environmental Council (BEC) is a non-profit environmental organization based in Butte County, California. Our mission is to protect and defend the land, air and water of Butte County and the surrounding region through action, advocacy and education.  BEC was formed in 1975 and for over 40 years, BEC has had a significant voice in shaping the environment and policies of Butte County and beyond.

BEC in the News

March 21, 2017

Highlights and Sticky Notes:The city of Chico Parks Division is hosting an orientation meeting March 30 for people who are interested in becoming parks volunteers.The meeting will be 6:30-8:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 421 Main St.Frequently the Parks Division volunteers team up with what Romain calls “partner organizations” that have special interests in the city’s open spaces. Among them are Friends of Bidwell Park, Friends of Comanche Creek Greenway, Chico Velo-Trailworks, Stream Team, California Native Plant Society and Butte Environmental Council.

“Our partnerships with these groups and our volunteers work together for the greater good, making our park and greenways more enjoyable for people,” said Romain.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

February 13, 2017

Highlights and Sticky Notes:The Biological Sciences Outreach Committee put on its second biology career fair at Chico State.Becky Holden from Butte Environmental Council answers questions from a student.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

February 3, 2017

Highlights and Sticky Notes:A public forum about where our water comes from and where it goes during — H20 Origins — is planned 6-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, in Room 111 of the new Arts and Humanities building at Chico State University.Becky Holden, assistant director of the Butte Environmental Council, will lead the forum, part of a larger monthly education seriesTags: no_tagby: ndcarter

BEC News Interests

April 12, 2017

Highlights and Sticky Notes:The water agency that supplies drinking water to Los Angeles agreed Tuesday to contribute $1.5 million toward the planning of Sites Reservoir in the Sacramento Valley, giving the agency a toehold in a potentially valuable storage project.Metropolitan General Manager Jeff Kightlinger has said he isn’t interested in investing in Sites unless California moves ahead with plans to build twin tunnels beneath the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, but he believes Metroplitan should contribute to planning and development costs as a way of maintaining its interest in the Sites project in the interim.Tags: water, california, sites, delta, river, twin tunnelsby: ndcarter

February 15, 2017

Highlights and Sticky Notes:A presentation on Western burrowing owls is planned for the monthly meeting of the Altacal Aububon Society, 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St.plans to increase local populations, including creation of the successful artificial habitat at Tuscan Preserve in Chico.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

January 5, 2017

Highlights and Sticky Notes:The state already has a lot of water infrastructure including reservoirs, aquifers, and dams.More than 1,400 dams play an integral role in helping move water from the northern part of the state to the southern portion.“The department has been looking at storage projects for many years,” Bardini said. “Not just for water supply but for environmental protection and meeting additional Delta outflow requirements.”Jim Watson is the Sites Reservoir Project manager who says this project could be one way to increase water storage in the state.Policy Advocate Ron Stork  with Sacramento based Friends of the River organization said the cost of building all of the major proposed projects in the state would surpass $9 billion and leave a large environmental footprint.“We can’t dam our way to paradise anymore because we  have already dammed most of our rivers,” Stork said.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

BEC's news feed is generated using Diigo, a social bookmarking tool.  You can see our full listing of news articles or subscribe to the RSS feed by visiting our Diigo group of BEC News Interests.