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19
Aug

Come out to Upper Bidwell Park and help us water oak seedlings!

 

 

25
Aug

Join us in removing invasive plants from Bidwell Park.

Spend your morning making a difference

 

 

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BEC Protects

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The Butte Environmental Council (BEC) is a non-profit environmental organization based in Butte County, California. Our mission is to protect and defend the land, air and water of Butte County and the surrounding region through action, advocacy and education.  BEC was formed in 1975 and for over 40 years, BEC has had a significant voice in shaping the environment and policies of Butte County and beyond.

BEC in the News

July 16, 2018

Highlights and Sticky Notes:Bamlet said that the Butte Environmental Council has a grant that will let it plant roughly 100 trees this fall, so he’s waiting until those get in the ground before moving forward with the city’s batch.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

July 2, 2018

Highlights and Sticky Notes:Putting environmentalists and residential well-users on equal footing with farmers, the Butte County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a resolution Tuesday (June 26) supporting the Butte Environmental Council’s involvement in groundwater management.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

June 11, 2018

Highlights and Sticky Notes:Scott Grist, who manages the event, believes in sustainability and uses this event to bring awareness to conscious thinking about environmental needs.
“We’re opening people up to the idea that we can use less fossil fuels and have a whole day live music festival powered by human effort,” Grist said.
The event is ran by volunteers giving in various ways including audience members signing up and powering the sound and instruments by pedaling stationary bicycles.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

BEC News Interests

August 9, 2018

Highlights and Sticky Notes:Community choice aggregation allows cities and counties to purchase power for their citizens, which can mean savings for residents and for the city as a power user.
The council agreed to further review a feasibility study done for the county which is also supportive of CCAs. In addition the city will launch a market analysis regarding the impact in Chico, as well as a community outreach.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

July 25, 2018

Highlights and Sticky Notes:“People are realizing we have to worry about more than just traditional industrial contaminants – we have to realize that nearly every aquifer has natural contaminants,” Fendorf said. “The question is simply, ‘Is the contaminant going to stay benign in the solid form, or is it going to get transferred into the water phase?’ We need to ensure the contaminants stay within the solids and do not jeopardize our water supplies.”Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

July 16, 2018

Highlights and Sticky Notes:Desperate to keep their crops alive, farmers in Fresno County drilled 763 new wells in 2015 alone, according to the Department of Water Resources. In Tulare County, the number of new irrigation wells hit 1,069 that year. Overall, Valley farmers removed enough groundwater during the drought to fill Shasta Lake seven times over, according to a study last year by researchers at UCLA and the University of Houston.Tags: no_tagby: ndcarter

BEC's news feed is generated using Diigo, a social bookmarking tool.  You can see our full listing of news articles or subscribe to the RSS feed by visiting our Diigo group of BEC News Interests.